Tech Tip – Software for the Serious Blogger – Part 1

Tech Tip – Software for the Serious Blogger – Part 1

April 5, 2018 Off By mikeshinoda

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PullQuote_IMIf you’re a blogger, then chances are you write and post most (if not all) of your blog entries using the interface that is provided by your blogging software or service. But, it doesn’t have to be that way. A good blogging client can make writing, editing, and posting blog entries a breeze.

Why use a blogging client? Maybe you don’t like the interface that your blogging software provides for writing entries. Maybe you want to write when you’re not connected to the Internet and then publish your blog posts later. Or, maybe you prefer to blog from the comfort of your computer’s desktop without firing up a Web browser.
No matter what your reasons are for using one, and no matter what operating system you use, there’s a blogging client for you.

What’s Out There for Windows and MacOS

As you might expect, Windows and MacOS have an almost embarrassingly large number of blogging clients. With so many options, it’s hard to choose. Here are three clients that make blogging from your desktop easy.

BlogJet

BlogJet_IMFor Windows, there’s BlogJet. In a tight little interface, you can write and edit your blog posts with the same ease as using a word processor. It works with many of the major blogging applications out there – including WordPress, Blogger, Movable Type, and TypePad – and has a number of interesting, but at the same time useful, features.

One example is the ability to insert images, either one on your hard drive or on your digital camera. With BlogJet, you can also attach files to your posts without having to worry about first uploading them to a server. On top of that, BlogJet can smoothly interact with photo-sharing site Flickr and with YouTube, enabling you to insert any images or video that you have on your site into your blog posts.

One feature of BlogJet that is quite useful is multiple posting: if you maintain several blogs, even using different applications, BlogJet can post the same entry to all of those blogs quickly and smoothly. On the downside, though, BlogJet costs $39.95 (USD). That could be a negative for someone who is on a budget or who prefers to use free or Open Source software.

Journler

Journ_IMOn the Mac side of the fence, there’s Journler. In a lot of ways, Journler is the Mac analogue to BlogJet. But in other w
ays, it outstrips its Windows counterpart. In addition to its WYSIWYG interface, Journler enables you to import documents and images and turn them into blog posts. Journler can import Rich Text Format, Microsoft Word, plain text, and HTML files. You can also import images in various formats into your posts.

But what really sets Journler apart from most other blogging clients is its ability to record audio and video. All you need is a computer microphone and a cheap digital camera and you have instant audio and video podcasts. And since Journler integrates with Apple’s iLife software suite, you can edit and enhance your audio and video.

While you have the option of paying for Journler, pricing is pretty reasonable. You can find details here.

Qumana Blog Editor

Qumana Blog Editor is a simple and free client that runs on both Windows and MacOS. It’s a lot like the other blogging clients discussed in this TechTip in its range of features and ease of use. Qumana has the ubiquitous WYSIWYG interface which makes authoring blog entries simple. Where you write your blog entries is more like a mail composition window in Outlook or Thunderbird than a word processor, though. Qumana Blog Editor works with over 16 blogging services and can post a single entry to multiple blogs running on multiple blogging services.

QumanaIf you want to monetize your blog, you can join Qumana’s Q-Ads program and insert targeted advertising into your blog posts right from the editor. That may not be an important feature to many bloggers, but there’s nothing wrong with trying to make a little money from your efforts!

Going Linux

Linux doesn’t have the range of blogging clients available for Windows and MacOS, but it still does pretty well in that area. Two applications that stand out are BloGTK and Drivel.

BloGTK

BloGTK is a small and simple blogging client. There’s nothing incredibly fancy or groundbreaking about it, but it’s easy to use and it gets the job done. The interface is quite simple — just a few buttons for formatting your blog entries and an area in which to type, and that’s about it.

On top of that, you can post to multiple blogging applications from BloGTK. Your formatting options, though, are limited to ordinary paragraphs, lists, tables, aligning text, and some character formatting. Then again, unless you’re doing some serious design in your posts, that’s pretty much all you need.

Going Linux

Linux doesn’t have the range of blogging clients available for Windows and MacOS, but it still does pretty well in that area. Two applications that stand out are BloGTK and Drivel.

BloGTK

BloGTK is a small and simple blogging client. There’s nothing incredibly fancy or groundbreaking about it, but it’s easy to use and it gets the job done. The interface is quite simple — just a few buttons for formatting your blog entries and an area in which to type, and that’s about it.

On top of that, you can post to multiple blogging applications from BloGTK. Blogger seems to be the main focus, while Movable Type and blogs that support the MetaWeblog framework (like WordPress and Windows Live Spaces are also supported. Your formatting options, though, are limited to ordinary paragraphs, lists, tables, aligning text, and some character formatting. Then again, unless you’re doing some serious design in your posts, that’s pretty much all you need.

Drivel Journal Editor

Drivel resembles BloGTK in many ways. The interface is quite spartan; even more so than BloGTK – there are no buttons, just menus. You can use it to post to multiple accounts and blogging applications, though Drivel offers only limited formatting options. That said, I find Drivel to be easier to use.

To start writing a post, you simply choose the name of the blog from a list when you start the application – Drivel supports multiple accounts. From there, you supply a password (unless you want Drivel to remember it) and once connected to your blog you just start writing— it’s that simple. While Drivel doesn’t offer much in the way of formatting options, it does have one feature lacking in many blogging clients: the ability to add a polls to a LiveJournal blog. So, if you want to see what the favourite movie of your visitors is, you can quickly construct a poll and insert it into your LiveJournal. My only wish is that Drivel could add polls to other blogging applications, too.

While the applications discussed in this TechTip are solid, they tie you down to a single operating system. If you’re interested in having a little more freedom while blogging, check out part two of this TechTip. It introduces a pair of blogging tools that can be used on any operating system, and three that you can use from your favourite Web browser.